Individual sellers and companies offering products or services have to deal with their consumers and ensure they are satisfied with what they have purchased. Thanks to the affiliate marketing structure, you’ll never have to be concerned with customer support or customer satisfaction. The entire job of the affiliate marketer is to link the seller with the consumer. The seller deals with any consumer complaints after you receive your commission from the sale.

Once you've signed up, you'll be able to create unique links that allow the company to track them back to you so you get credit for the referrals you provide. It's important to read the fine print to know the limitations of how and where you're allowed to include the links because it varies from program to program. You can then start dropping these links into places where readers are likely to click on them and buy whatever is being advertised. These places include blog posts, newsletters, and Twitter and Facebook posts. (See also: How to Earn Extra Income With Twitter)
Freelancer – refer people to developers, designers, and other freelancers you’ve worked with and make 100% of Freelancer’s project commission for the first 90 days. I get a lot of people requesting WordPress speed optimization services… so I refer them to my developers with a freelancer affiliate link and make $125/month in passive income. You can’t use affiliate links to link to specific freelancer profiles, so I direct people to the homepage via affiliate link and give people my developer’s usernames.
So, a program that promises you anything outrageous should send you immediate red flags. Secondly, the best affiliate marketing training programs offer comprehensive support. Most people starting out in affiliate marketing do not have any formal training in web design, sales and marketing, and content creation. A good program will support you from beginning to end with lots of instructional classes and videos and expert technical support to help you fully understand the business.
Once you've protected your prospecting pool, maximize your affiliate program by working with the best and leaving the rest. As the old 80/20 adage implies, most of your revenue will come from a very small percentage of your affiliates. Because it can be time-consuming to manage a larger affiliate network, consider selecting only a few companies initially, and interview them before signing them on. Affiliates are an extension of your sales force and represent your online brand, so choose partners carefully.

Keep in mind though, you don’t need a website to do sponsored content since you can also get paid if you have a lot of social media followers. My wife has a pretty big Instagram following, and she gets all kinds of sponsorships. Not only does she get paid in cash, but we get a lot of free stuff, too. We’ve received free rugs, free lights, and free carpet cleaners. She only promotes things she loves though, so this strategy works really well for her.
Creating blog content is a very useful and effective way of consistently building content on a site. When creating blog posts, it's a good idea to do some keyword research to figure out what it is that your audience is interested in and searching for online. Also, be sure to research competitors, forums and social media to narrow down on topics for your blog. 

#2: Another great program is Jon Dykstra's Niche Tycoon. This focuses on paid traffic and outsourcing content to make money with Google Adsense (and similar programs). It requires a bit more of a budget, and also has less of a support community than Wealthy Affiliate, so it's best for people with a bit of online marketing experience and some money to get their business going.

Always disclose your affiliate relationship. Most visitors will probably understand that graphic ads will lead to your getting paid, but if you write a review or use an in-text link as a recommendation, you want your readers to know that may lead to compensation as well. This ensures you retain transparency and trust with your readers, but also, it's required by the FTC's endorsement rules.
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