I personally prefer to do it that way--you can create a more convincing review that's more likely to make sales. It's not always possible or practical, though; for example, would you break up with your significant other just to test a product for getting your ex back? ;-) In cases like that, or if the product is expensive, it's usually best just to use the vendor's affiliate resources instead.

I want to do an “inspirational” post to help newbies see that affiliate marketing is a long-range game plan, not a “get rich quick” scheme. Looking for those willing to share how long it took to get the first affiliate sale and a bit of insight into how you did it. Of course, your name and your website/blog link will be included. You can share it here, or email me.
Affiliate programs are a form of online marketing employed by advertisers seeking referrals from a wide range of sources. They usually offer a commission, which reflects a percentage of every sale made from the referral link. So if you have a website or a mailing list and you link to a product or retailer using a tracking link, the advertiser will know that that customer came from your link and if they buy, you will be paid commission.
If you’re interested in affiliate marketing, you generally need to put a little thought into what types of products you’d like to feature. Having a niche or some kind of focus will help get eager buyers to your site much quicker than simply advertising anything under the sun. Next, purchase a domain name and website hosting, and then get your website up and running.

The problem with affiliate marketing, like many other home business options, are the so-called gurus and get-rich-quick programs that suggest affiliate marketing can be done fast and with little effort. Odds are you've read claims of affiliate marketing programs that say you can make hundreds of thousands of dollars a month doing almost nothing ("Three clicks to rich!"). Or, they suggest you can set up your affiliate site, and then forget it, except to check your bank deposits.
×